‘Smart’ genes put us at risk of mental illness

From PhysOrg:

Data from new research, published today in the journal Nature Neuroscience, was analysed by Dr Richard Emes, a bioinformatics expert from the School of Veterinary Medicine and Science at The University of Nottingham. The results showed that disease-causing mutations occur in the genes that evolved to make us smarter than our fellow animals. Dr Emes, Director of The University of Nottingham's Advanced Data Analysis Centre, conducted an analysis of the of the Discs Large homolog (Dlg) family of genes which make some of the essential building blocks of the synapse—the connection between in the brain. He said: “This study highlights the importance of the synapse proteome—the proteins involved in the brains signalling processes—in the understanding of cognition and the power of comparative studies to investigate human disease.”

The study involved scientists from The University of Edinburgh, The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, the University of Aberdeen, The University of Nottingham and the University of Cambridge. This cross-disciplinary team of experts carried out what they believe to be the first genetic dissection of the vertebrate's ability to perform complex forms of learning, attention and function. They focussed on Dlg—a family of genes that humans shared with the ancestor of all backboned animals some 550 million years ago. like the Dlgs arose by duplication of DNA, changed by mutation over millions of years and now contribute to the complex we have today. However, this redundancy and subsequent accumulation of changes in the DNA may have led to increased susceptibility to some diseases.

More here.

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